Monday, October 10, 2016

CAJUN CATHOLICS: A FIELD TRIP TO THE BAYOU


I CAUGHT A BREAM (PRONOUNCED BRIM)
IN THE ATCHAFALAYA SWAMP.
A few weeks ago I was in Lafayette, Louisiana: Cajun country.

Here's how the piece I wrote about my time there begins:

Recently I was graced to travel to Lafayette, Louisiana, and spend the better part of a week with some of the good people of the bayou.

Father Sam Fontana of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Rayne brought me there. The night before I flew out, he told me, “I need to visit the bishop tomorrow, then make a bread pudding.”

Now that’s a priest!

As you may know, the French-speaking Acadians (from which the word Cajun is derived) were expelled by the British from Nova Scotia in 1755 and made their way to southern Louisiana. Along with the Indians, Africans, Creoles, Frenchmen and Spaniards who lived there, they contributed to produce a rich historical-cultural gumbo that has evolved over the centuries.

Cajuns are fiercely proud of their culture and way of life. Wary of outsiders — “If it’s tourist season, why can’t we shoot ’em?” read one bumper sticker — they were nonetheless hugely welcoming, generous and hospitable to me.

READ THE WHOLE PIECE HERE.


2 comments:

  1. You are adorable. The fish, however, is ugly. I'm so happy you got to take that trip.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You are adorable. The fish, however, is ugly. I'm so happy you got to take that trip.

    ReplyDelete

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