Saturday, March 28, 2015

SLIDE SHOW, OLD-SCHOOL, SEATTLE


Welp I have had quite a week and never let it be said that I am one to lie abed and neglect to explore my environs.

Of course I am utterly depleted, drained and exhausted but hey, someone has to jet about, eat seafood on other people's dime, merrily ferry-hop, gaze out from the deck of his or her room at an eagle's nest, watch the tide go in and out, and wonder...

Anyway, before I leave I wanted to post these last (many) pix. Even so, they represent but a tiny fraction of all I have seen and experienced.




 



THESE WERE ALL TAKEN ON OR AROUND THE GROUNDS AT
THE ARCHBISHOP BRUNETT RETREAT CENTER,
30 MILES SOUTH OF SEATTLE


THESE ARE IN INVASIVE PLANT COLLOQUIALLY CALLED
HORSE TAILS. THEY GROW IN MINIATURE STRIPED FORESTS.
 










FROM THE FERNS DOWN WERE TAKEN AT DASH POINT STATE PARK,
FEDERAL WAY


TO ADD TO ONGOING
"RANDOM LEAVES ON SIDEWALK" SERIES




CALLING RESIDENT BOTANIST MICHAEL DEMERS.
WHAT ARE THESE?
THEY GROW IN MARSHY AREAS AND THE BRIGHT YELLOW FLOWER
LOOKS LIKE A COBRA'S HOOD.
HAVE NEVER SEEN BEFORE!.

8 comments:

  1. I am not a botanist, nor is my name Michael. :) But I do happen to know that those last pictures are of the Western Skunk Cabbage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysichiton_americanus
    Heather, I was privileged to attend the retreat at the Archbishop Brunett Retreat & Faith Formation Center at The Palisades (whew! no disrespect intended to our dear retired archbish, but I think most folks still refer to it more simply as 'the Palisades'). What a wonderful weekend it was - thank you, thank you, thank you! I am glad that you enjoyed our little corner of God's beautiful world despite the (relative) cold. I hope you will come again very soon!
    With love and blessings to you ~ Karen from Bremerton

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  2. Heather, Karen is a better botanist than I plus she's a local to boot. No contest. All these pictures make an old desert rat like me hyperventilate. Beautiful.

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  3. Ooh, I love those horsetails. Be sure to dig the mud out of your boots. Ahhh, that Northwest rain.

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  4. Western skunk cabbage, okay then! I feel like I barely scratched the surface of the great Pacific Northwest and now I'm home but it was a beautiful and action-packed trip...And Michael, you have come through so many times I do consider you the or at least a resident botanist. Thanks to all....

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  5. Oh, but who can complain of a plant being invasive when it looks like that!?!!!

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    1. Exactly! Such a metaphor for us mortal, messy but beautiful people! Bless you, Alicia Rae!

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