Thursday, February 21, 2013

PALM SPRINGS


I spent last week, including Ash Wednesday in Palm Springs, house-sitting for my friend Christine.

I've been out there several times now.

A resort for rich retired folks who live in air-conditioned isolation, a downtown featuring a giant statue of Marilyn Monroe, blocks of dead-quiet houses, casinos: Palm Springs is not,  at first glance my kind of town.

But this time I realized I was starting to feel a real affection for the place, and I finally figured out why: if you look closely, Palm Springs is littered with the near-dead and dying. Everyone’s staggering around with a walkalator, a wheelchair, a set of crutches, or a cane. Every Mass is punctuated by the steady pffft, pfft, of  breathing machines. Ahead of you line at the P.O. is a Gloria Swanson look-alike in a mangy cheetah car coat, her cadaverous wrists weighed down by gold bracelets. A guy in a toupee pulls his cream-colored Bentley up to Staples and totters in to buy printer toner.

Unlike in most places, people are nice to old folks here because they have dough and old people need a lot of things done: their pools cleaned, their nails painted, their faces lifted, their mid-century furniture appraised, their poor aching bodies massaged; to be carted off to the ER, the rest home, and eventually, the crematorium. Octogenarian spouses hold one another up as they laboriously cross Palm Canyon. Nonagenarians, odometers strapped to their arms, shuffle on tanned varicose-veined legs toward the spa. So it’s very poignant, this valiant effort to stave off death, the decreptitude beneath the glittering palm trees, the manicured golf courses and the corruption of the bodies making their way around it…

I like the contrast—death and resurrection. Death to which the sun at first seems a balm, and then--too often, I'd often catch;my face in the mirror in the harsh high-noon light--becomes a cruel unrelenting exposure.

You can mask it all you want.

But Palm Springs, like life, is a desert…





5 comments:

  1. Death is is inevitable. I know that sounds depressing but in the end our bodies will crumble. What matters is the soul, that's what lives on. We know that in the end we will be seated at the right hand of God. We will have everlasting life. We are always young in god's eyes. Our spirit will endure forever.

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  2. Poetry, Heather, that piece is poetry. The way you draw out from the commonplace every ounce of poignancy,life and meaning. Thank you!

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  3. Wow, those images just depressed the heck out of me! I think I have to go listen to some bluegrass real loud to counteract it all! Right after I say my rosary.

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  4. I'm sure when Jesus spent 40 days in the desert it wasn't anything like Palm Springs.

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  5. I visited Palm Springs this past spring. Old folks, money, and golf courses do in fact come to mind but what I recall was the Tahquitz Canyon waterfall. Beautiful!

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