Thursday, January 24, 2013

NO IDEAS BUT IN THINGS


furniture store, sunset blvd., silver lake

i have a new glazed coffee cup from provence!

one of two pillows i recently fashioned from a thrift-store pair of drapes

knitting project--lap rug. this represents four james bond movies.

my friend ann sent me an orchid!

"No ideas but in things."
--William Carlos Williams

22 comments:

  1. Dear Heather,
    I have fallen into what has become a prolonged Internet silence so ideas in things speaks in a way I can appreciate and absorb. Thanks for posting these ideas.

    I am painting (thank God for that) but I can't find the will to reinvent my site (I thought I could). I'm not writing poetry, that is not good...though the red chair sparks a memory behind which a poem, an idea reposes.

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  2. "Love calls us to the things of this world" ~ Richard Wilbur

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  3. The mustard yellow / orange hue of the photographs is lovely. And how creative - knitting a throw! Do you find knitting to be a life-giving activity?

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  4. " Do you find knitting to be a life-giving activity?"

    I love this question. I used to ask that of others. I forget to ask it often enough of myself and have spent too much of my life bending to accommodate others, to help them out by doing things that have not brought life to me. How kind of the Divine (well, I am attributing it this way) to give me a reminder, serendipitously.

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  5. Oh, well I am glad you could be reminded.

    Perhaps, Owen, you are familiar with the Enneagram? You should read about Enneagram type 2s. This type of individual pours so much into others they often neglect caring for themselves. Or, even if they recognize this tendency in themselves they prefer to take on the role of martyr. Maybe this isn't you - but, either way I have found the enneagram to be surprisingly beneficial in understanding myself. As a type 4 (the artist/individualist) I find it crucial for me to participate in life-giving activities to lessen my melancholy. Lol.

    In case you are interested: http://www.enneagraminstitute.com/typetwo.asp#.UQFzJs1GodA

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  6. Love the knitting and james bond equation. My knitting projects are usually measured by my kids' hockey practices or doctor's appointments! I am enjoying your blog...found it while searching for info on Msgr Albacete after hearing him speak at the New York Encounter this past weekend.

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  7. Oh yes, I find knitting deeply life-giving! It allows my mind to lie fallow and thus has a tranquilizing effect that I'm sure is particularly life-giving to the people around me who would otherwise have to put up with my extremely tightly-wound nervous system...then of course I find warm scarves and lap blankets also way toward life...

    Was thinking of Msgr. Albacete this morning. Now he is the real thing. At the end of the day--and the beginning for that matter--it's not how smart we are, how articulate and long-winded our 'theories,' how 'deep' our thoughts. It's how we are treating 'the least of these,' which is to say the person beside us. I once had the great honor of having a public 'conversation' with Monsignor, and his innate generosity and warmth, his utter welcome, his sense of humor, the way his very face and eyes and voice incorporate, incarnate, his regard for and interest in you, and in all people and things...that is intelligence in the deepest sense of the word. It doesn't hurt that he's also brilliant, but to sit beside someone whose very presence 'is' the deepest kind of heart, soul, strength, and mind is an experience that will stay with me always. "I AM WHO AM." It's our very being that becomes, or can become, the light of Christ...

    I'm a 4, too, Alicia Rae. So glad the red chair sparked a memory, a poem, Owen...And thanks for the Wilbur quote, Tom!

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  8. One of our parish priests is big on the Enneagram as a result of being a big Richard Rohr fan. Others write it off the entirety as New Age and will have nothing to do with anything at the mere mention of Rohr's name. I don't know either way. I find I know less and less these days.

    I've done any number of profiles over the years. One of our adult kids has done the Enneagram (without becoming anathama) and I have considered it. Maybe it's time.

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  9. Heather,
    I appreciate your honesty. I was first introduced to your words in Magnificat and had to read more.
    Blessings!

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  10. Heather,
    I first read your words in Magnificat and had to read more. Your honesty is refreshing!
    Blessings

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  11. If this were Facebook I would "like" Michael Carter's comment (though SoF blog is where I first encountered your writing, dear Heather.

    So I did an online version of the Enneagramm and hope my soul is not in peril (maybe a few extra days in Purgatory). Enneway, I'm a 4 (at least today). I don't really know what that means. Maybe I should sit in the red chair a little longer.

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  12. A 4 means you have a huge sappy heart that is sort of ineffective and an embarrassment and always being broken.

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  13. Broken more by myself than by others.

    And, I've noticed a change in what profiling myself reveals in my (now very) post-ordained-Protestant-pastor days. I used to be such an efficient cracker. I was always putting myself out for others. Today, when given very late notice about an only-now confirmed date for something we were to co-lead I politely said, too bad, made plans, won't be there. There was a day when I never would have left'em high and dry but that's how we were left and I (selfishly?) decided to put ourself (my Love and I) first this weekend. Not sure if that's effective or ineffective.

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  14. Just read this http://www.eclecticenergies.com/enneagram/type4.php and would have to day it's pretty true of me.

    "Fours are prone to fantasizing about a savior who will rescue them from their unhappiness." Dear Jesus, this cracked me up. (*you see what I did there, no doubt).

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  15. Heather--

    Today, at least in the Catholic World, you are famous. Your story "The Conversion of Saint Paul" is in today's "Meditation of the Day" section of the Magnificat. I am an RCIA Candidate from Johns Creek, Georgia (formerly of Tarzana, CA) dipping my proverbial toe into the holy water :-)

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  16. Heather--

    Today, at least in the Catholic World, you are famous. Your story "The Conversion of Saint Paul" is in today's "Meditation of the Day" section of the Magnificat. I am an RCIA Candidate from Johns Creek, Georgia (formerly of Tarzana, CA) dipping my proverbial toe into the holy water :-)

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  17. Heather, I had you pinned as a 4 from the start! Perhaps that's why I was drawn in.

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  18. Your reflection this morning on St. Paul, was as always beautiful. Your book, Shirt of Flame, will be my companion next week, after much radiation therapy.

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  19. I just finished your books Redeemed and Parched. They changed my life! I plan to come hear you in Pgh in March, and Gd willing, Philly retreat in May.
    Until then, I thank you for your brutal honesty and vulnerabilty. You are saving lives.

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  20. wow, thank you, folks. Juls, I actually have an essay in Magnificat each month for 2103--obviously a very great honor...Mel, radiation therapy...may you be held in prayer...and Molly, I so look forward to meeting you in PA. And Owen that is major progress in my book, putting yourself first for once...

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  21. Hi Heather and All: Today's blog is just so wonderful. All those beautiful pictures made me think of an article that used to run in Womens Day each week. It was a little box called "Lifesavors" and in it would be a list of things like: a firm handshake, hot coffee, a free donut, an unexpected smile, etc. When I read your meditation/essay in Magnificat today, Heather, I was just blown away. I sat there weeping and had to read it again because it just made me be there on that lake with you. Thank you so much for your love and respect and your honesty. "Why do you persecute me?" - oh, we all have a blue heron; at least I do and hope everyone has one. A blessed day and thanks again for the wonderful pictures.

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  22. I, too, am a 'groupie' from the Magnificat and have been drawn into the 'shirt of flame'.
    I just have to say... there is NOTHING like a great new coffee mug (in my case tea)! I rotate them my top shelf, where I cannot reach, to my bottom shelf at whim. Each mug is a story to me.

    Which reminds me, that the education world there is a pedagogy called 'object based learning' & I can tell you it is a very powerful learning tool.
    I look forward to more things!

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