Thursday, September 13, 2012

I'M HOME--FOR NOW...




ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH
CAMP STREET, NEW ORLEANS 
 To be angry with God means to realize at the deepest level, a place that is both physical and emotional at the same time, that the world is broken and not as it should be. Anger at God is protest against suffering. That suffering can be caused by social inequity and structural injustice, but it is also caused by personal losses, physical pain, and the reality of death, our own and that of others—this cruelty built into the human condition. To be angry at God, not in theory or idea, but in the body—the anger that rises up from the solar plexus and out through the arms and legs and mouth—is to pray, for it is to lay bare, in the most intimate way, the wounds of life felt deep in the body itself, to expose them as though open to the sun, to expose the deepest part of the self to God, that unknowable Other who lurks in wheat fields on the sun-baked high plains of Spain.

--Kerry Egan, from Fumbling: A Pilgrimage Tale of Love, Grief, and Spiritual Renewal of the Camino de Santiago

LAFAYETTE CEMETERY
WASHINGTON AVENUE, NEW ORLEANS, GARDEN DISTRICT


LAX

8 comments:

  1. Welcome back, Heather! Rest up :)

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  2. Beautiful photographs. And Ms Egan's words are difficult to controvert. The world is broken, and subject to the mystery of iniquity, and yet ... it is this same world which, as Fr Hopkins tells us, is "charged with the grandeur of God."

    May that same God bless you today and always!

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  3. Dear Heather,
    How did Egan get a copy of my diary?

    P.S. Welcome home, for now.

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  4. Love that Egan quote. So very true.

    Welcome home, Heather!

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  5. Hi Heather:

    I'm confused by the reference to the "unknowable Other". Certainly there are things about God that aren't capable of being handled by reason, but the Christian God seems to have gone out of his way to reveal himself, hasn't he? I'm confident I'm missing some context here.

    Any serious meditation on suffering is worthy of consideration and the physical "anger" phenomenon described here has the ring of truth. Thanks...

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  6. I really, really, really, really, really want to walk the Camino.

    That stained glass is beautiful. Is the first picture a dome, or just a window seen through an arch?

    AMDG

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  7. Looking up at the ceiling over the altar...truly beautiful old neighborhood church...

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  8. Thank you Heather for sharing Kerry Egan's words, rich with insight and what my experience knows to be truth.

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I WELCOME your comments!!!