Wednesday, September 19, 2012

ABANDONMENT TO DIVINE PROVIDENCE

detail: algae-festooned back yard fountain
"The divine life is neither seen nor felt, but there is never a moment when it is not acting in an unknown but very sure manner. It is hidden under such things as death of the body, damnation of the soul, and the general disorder of all earthly affairs. Faith is nourished and strengthened by these happenings. It cuts through them all and takes the hand of God, who keeps it alive through everything except sin. A faithful soul should always advance with confidence, regarding all these things as the disguise God assumes, for his immediate presence would terrify us. But God, who comforts the humble, always gives us, however great our feeling of desolation, an inner assurance that we need be afraid of nothing as long as we allow him to act and abandon ourselves to him. Although we are distressed at the loss of our beloved, we somehow feel that we still possess him, and in spite of all our troubles and disturbance, there is something deep-seated within us which keeps us steadfastly attached. to God. 'Truly' said Jacob, 'God is in this place and I never knew it' (Gen. 28:16)."
--Jean-Pierre de Caussade, Abandonment to Divine Providence

beargrass, around descanso and edgecliffe, silver lake l.a.

15 comments:

  1. Truly God is in this place and I never knew it. How powerful that is. Lately, I've been thinking a lot about C. Houselander talking about the Hidden Christ and trying to keep that in the front of my mind whenever I'm with or around other people. And I've also been thinking about a letter where she says that whatever happens to you is not only God's will for you, but is Jesus Himself.

    So, that quote from Genesis is like a third companion to the other two: Christ in everyone, Christ in every circumstance, Christ in every place. A little trinity of epiphanies.

    I know, of course, that Jacob was speaking of a specific place, a place that was set aside, but with the coming of Christ, all places are.

    I'm sitting here thinking about my office as a place where God truly is, and, believe me, that doesn't happen often.

    AMDG

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  2. I just never know, am I the lichen or the fountain?

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  3. This book by Caussade has become one of my all-time favorites. Thanks for posting this. Very timely. I love how he says that God comes to us under the disguise of all those difficult things. We want to see him with our senses and proofs, and we want to understand him with our ideas, but God "hides" precisely behind these things. They do not reveal him, but rather hide him. If we focus on them, we miss God. Faith comes from some deeper sense. Seeing is definitely NOT believing.

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  4. This book by Caussade has become one of my all-time favorites. Thanks for posting this. Very timely. I love how he says that God comes to us under the disguise of all those difficult things. We want to see him with our senses and proofs, and we want to understand him with our ideas, but God "hides" precisely behind these things. They do not reveal him, but rather hide him. If we focus on them, we miss God. Faith comes from some deeper sense. Seeing is definitely NOT believing.

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  5. "So may this seed germinate in your heart, God's secret hiding place, and through his mysterious virtue throw out branches, leaves, flowers, and fruit which you cannot see but by which others will be nourished and enchanted. ... Exist little worm, in the dark confines of your narrow cocoon, until the warmth of grace hatches you out. Then devour the leaves offered you, and, forgetting the quietude you have abandoned, surrender yourself to this activity, until divine nature stops you. ... Then spin your silk in secret, unconscious of what you are doing, inwardly dissatisfied with yourself, envying your companions who are dead and at peace, admiring them even though they never reached your degree of perfection. ... Who could ever have guessed what nature makes of a silk worm unless they had seen it! Only give it leaves, nature does the rest."
    (from the end of Part 6, published as The Sacrament of the Present Moment, transl. Kitty Muggeridge)

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  6. It always feels like refreshment
    when I come across the Truth.Thank you for being the channel....

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  7. I feel it time I read this book. I have meagre means so I may just end up purchasing the .99 edition for my Kobo e-reader (which itself is a gift). But, that aside, I know there are many editions of this title available. Some may have notes or be a certain translation. Is there an edition that you Heather or anyone contributing to the combox thread feels particularly passionate about?

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  8. My copy is translated by and with an intro by John Beevers. Don't have anything to compare it to but it's served me well plus I love the cover ("Landscape with Waterfall" by Watteau). I got paid several years ago to "translate" the book into contemporary language for what may someday be a PBS special on Mysticism, so Abandonment is dear to my heart for that reason as well.

    As I told another friend, I happened to pick it up the other day, which I hadn't for a long time, and opened it, seemingly at random, to just the page I "needed"...thanks for weighing in, all, and on the video.

    We've been sitting vigil with my mother all week, in our ways--apparently she is defying all laws of nature--even the staff at the nursing home in NH can't believe she's still hanging on, God bless her. The point being I treasure every comment...as always, the blog and you all help sustain me...

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  9. Thank you Heather. I see that edition at Booksforless and as a digital edition for more. Wow, would love to have a copy you translated. Hope that comes about.

    Our former priest's Mom died last year. She seemed to wait. Something happened, someone came and when she knew that she let herself go.

    Prayers tonight for your Mom and family.

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  10. Prayers for you, your mother, and your family, Heather.

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  11. I recommend the Beevers translation that Heather mentioned. It's much more accessible. But I don't know if he translated all of the letters as well. I think the 99 cent ebook edition has the whole thing. So, both are worth getting.

    Heather, speaking of your video, have you ever seen "The Cruise". The film documents the worldview and personality of New York City bus tour guide Timothy "Speed" Levitch. I haven't watched your video, but your description of it somehow reminded me of this. Worth seeing.

    Prayers for you and your mom, and everyone. God's mercy flows all around.

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  12. I recommend the Beevers translation that Heather mentioned. It's much more accessible. But I don't know if he translated all of the letters as well. I think the 99 cent ebook edition has the whole thing. So, both are worth getting.

    Heather, speaking of your video, have you ever seen "The Cruise". The film documents the worldview and personality of New York City bus tour guide Timothy "Speed" Levitch. I haven't watched your video, but your description of it somehow reminded me of this. Worth seeing.

    Prayers for you and your mom, and everyone. God's mercy flows all around.

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  13. Nathan, thanks.

    I did purchase the 0.99 e-reader edition but as it happens this morning I found the Beevers edition and one published by TAN with yet another translator and as I received payment for some artwork today I went ahead and got both for 13.00 + free international shipping. I plan on reading all three over the next season.

    - - -
    Continued prayers ...

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  14. I would read your blog anyway if it had no pictures, for your story. But the pictures! And the video walk to Mass! I love the things that grow in California and I drink them in, looking at your pictures. I am your opposite: transplanted West to East rather than East to West. I miss LA. Thank you for continually sharing with all of us.

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  15. If Christ is in me, so to He is in everyone. It is almost annoying at times but a reminder.

    You are a wealth of contemplation.

    For whatever reason it made me think of Tommy from the Who. http://youtu.be/QV_9pn7MGUo

    Thanks for all you do.

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