Sunday, April 22, 2012

THE HOUSE IS BLACK

FORUGH (also spelled FOROUGH) FARROKHZĀD
(1935-1967, died in car crash at age of 32)
This astonishing 1963 documentary short by the iconoclastic Iranian poet, journalist and film-maker Forugh Farrokhzād captures the lives, suffering, beauty and humanity of the members of a leper colony. Reviewer Eric Henderson described the film as follows: "One of the prototypal essay films, The House is Black paved the way for the Iranian New Wave."

Netflix synopsis:

"Iranian poet Forough Farrokhzad's documentary bravely delves into the world of people suffering from leprosy. Farrokhzad composed the poetic narration for her highly stylized and moving film, which depicts the realities of living with the disease, from daily routines to physical challenges and societal stigma. Extras include an interview with poet Pooran Farrokhzad (Forough's sister) and two short films by Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf."

There is no shortness of ugliness in the world
If man closed his eyes to it,
there would be even more...

Who is this in hell?
Who is this in hell,
praising you, O Lord?...

I will sing your name, O Lord.
I will sing your name with the ten-stringed lute
For I have been made in a strange and frightening shape...

Like doves we cry for justice--
and there is none.
We wait for light
and darkness reigns...

O overrunning river driven
by the touch of love,
flow to us, flow to us...


5 comments:

  1. Heather, Thank you for the painful but wonderful things that you share on your blog. I just happened to be reading Tomas Halik's new book, Night of the Confessor: Christian Faith in an Age of Uncertainty, whose opening chapter speaks of the Crucifixion and Resurrection as a unified event, of God dwelling hidden among us in our poverty and brokenness. A learned and wise priest gave me the book--said it was profound. I think you would like it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. haunting film...
    haunting, the gentle dignity that glows through the suffering.
    haunting, the ugliness and suffering, thank you God that among my many afflictions I do not suffer leprosy.
    haunting, that aren't they really all of us?
    thank you again, Heather, for inviting us to know ourselves and marvel at humanity.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I know gals, isn't this just incredible? Way way "Catholic" as in catholic, as in human, wrenching, and real...I, too, felt, Oh they are me...thanks, Dianne, I have made a note of the Tomas Halik book--not in the LAPL but sounds wonderful...

    ReplyDelete
  4. I wanted to turn the painful images off, but truth gripped my aching heart, knowing full well there, but for the grace of God, go I/we. I saw Jesus' face in everyone.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I wanted to turn the painful images off, but truth gripped my aching heart, knowing full well there, but for the grace of God, go I/we. I saw Jesus' face in everyone.

    ReplyDelete

I WELCOME your comments!!!