Thursday, April 26, 2012

THE GLORIES OF MY WEEK, IN E-MAILS

THE JACARANDAS ARE OUT
From my friend Christine in Palm Springs:

"Girls, I just made a great salad. You chop up fresh pineapple, avocado and jicama. Add some red or green onions and chopped cilantro. Make a lime vinaigrette and toss it. You could probably add peppers, too, to spice it up. It's really a refreshing salad for summer. xoxo Christine"

From Fr. Bob Cook, OFM Conv.,

"Regarding Flannery and her view of dogma, I think you will find a lot of similarities between her thought and that of Benedict XVI-- primarily because they are both heavily influenced by the theology of Romano Guardini. Some call him B16's favorite theologian.... Regarding Flannery, her library had more of Guardini's books than any other theologian/philosopher and he was second only to Francois Mauriac in number of volumes. My MA thesis was an attempt to prove that "The Enduring Chill" was a literary application of Guardini's theology of dogma...

"The Enduring Chill" is the one with Asbury-- Dogma shows up when Father Finn verbally bludgeons him with the Baltimore Catechism, screaming "you are an ignorant conceited boy!"...  classic!  The interesting thing is that dogma has the precise effect on Asbury that Guardini says it should-- and she was reading and recommending Guardini on dogma at the time that she is writing the story. Too cool!

There has been a lot written on the mother/daughter dynamic in her stories ("Everything That Rises Must Converge" is one of the most painful stories I've ever read).  The magnum opus of Flannery lit crit is R. Neil Scott's compilation "Flannery O'Connor:  An Annotated Reference Guide to Criticism", which has a whole bunch of stuff on mother-child relationships in her fiction."


MEXICAN SAGE, UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL
FOUNTAIN AND LAUREL, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA
ON MY WAY TO MY FRIEND PATRICK'S
HE MADE ME ROASTED TOMATO SOUP AND SOURDOUGH BREAD
WITH MISO-HUMMOUS SPREAD
From my friend Ben: I'm godmother to Lydia, one of his twin 2-year-old daughters:

"Potty time is still a work in progress. They pee great but they save up their poops for nap time and bed time.

Lately Lydia thinks everything is boring. I put her in her booster seat for her snack yesterday and she said "Not this room, I don't like this room." I said "What room?" and she said "This house. It's BORING!

She has also become a big fan of Dora the Explorer. And she has taken to singing/chanting "Bubbles, bubbles in the sink" when she washes her hands."


That's my girl!

From Andrew Matt of Magnificat, whose remarks on Flannery O'Connor, the Pope, and dogma I posted Wednesday:

You’re one-of-a-kind, kiddo, so full of surprises, so full of penetrating insights, unfurling such a cornucopia of glory on your blog all the time (I just can’t WAIT to watch the Forugh Farrokhzād video you posted a couple days ago!), that it’s really TOO MUCH in the best possible meaning of the phrase, namely, a real Catholic universality of human experience (I love that the word Catholic means reflecting the whole [kata + holos = about the whole]).

In other words, (and please pardon that last pendantic little etymological foray; I just go nuts sometimes over the beauty of roots and rhizomes and such), what I love about you is that you are so open to the infinite Wholeness of the faith and God and the whacky world he created. For you reflect what is most attractive about Catholicism’s heart, body, and soul. You’re akin to little Therese, who said (I think; or something to this effect): “I desire EVERYTHING!”


And I won't gild the lily on this last:

"hi heather.

that was a really strange phone call. i felt sick afterward."

A GIANT VELVETY GREEN LEAF
WITH A LITTLE SAD BUT I PREFER TO THINK HOPEFUL BROWN SPOT AT THE TIP

4 comments:

  1. Ah Heather, I love how 'catholic' you are too! I haven't commented for ages as I was off the internet for Lent and so far, my Easter is feeling like an extension of Lent with a lot of very tough challenges (but I'm trying to journey through them with the knowledge that the risen Christ is in the midst of it all in my mind!!!)
    I cried, pondered, smiled and finally laughed my way through these exchanges. God bless you, wonderful woman!!!

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  2. ¡Un saludo desde España,Heather! Thanks so much for your photo of the first jacarandas---one of the things I miss most when I return to Spain each spring...So happy my friend Liz has joined your blog family and (with your encouragement) finally met Flannery O. Just last week, I downloaded RG's "The Lord" on my Kindle and was planning to get reacquainted with Mauriac. The way you tie it all together is truly a gift from on high. ¡Hasta pronto!

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  3. I'm liking the look of that Mexican sage!

    Fr Cook mentions François Mauriac, and I can't miss a chance to put in a good word for Mauriac's Anguish and Joy of the Christian Life, a fascinating and relatively short book all about, well, all about what the title says! (In the initial pages, Mauriac makes some peevish remarks about Islam, which are somewhat beside the point, but I do recommend the book highly.)

    Bludgeoning someone with the Baltimore Catechism? Good heavens! I recall with a smile a film in which a mother would whack her grown ne'er-do-well son with a copy of The Holy Bible (bringing new meaning to the expression "Bible-thumper"!).

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  4. I don't know how you do it Heather.
    The beauty of your words: the spirituality of your self- it's a sober gift. And I am grateful for that, especially now.

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